25 wastes to add to your compost

25 wastes to add to your compost

If you've already started composting, you're probably already aware of the basic idea. You already have a place where you throw your peels, cores, leaves and other organic waste. Your table scraps or gardening surplus are already collected in order to kill two birds with one stone; either (a) avoid burying these organic materials which generate greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4) in an oxygen-free environment, (b) create a super 100% natural fertilizer for your garden. To take composting to the next level, and further reduce your household waste, here is a list of some less discussed items that can also be thrown in your compost bin.

1. Shredded newsprint
Most newspapers today are printed with non-toxic inks and pose no health risk.

2. Napkins
But only if used for cleaning food, if you mop up what might have chemicals don't put them in the compost to avoid possible contamination.

3. Beer and Wine
If your wine is corked or your beer is flat, don't worry, just pour it on the compost heap.

4. Expired spices

5. Nest of hamsters, rabbits and guinea pigs.

6. Cotton or wool clothes
You have to make sure that 100% of the material is either natural (cotton, hemp, flax, wool, burlap) or cellulosic (viscose, rayon, modal, lyocell, cupro) fibers. Even so, it doesn't mean that the sewing thread, labels, elastic, button, zippers or any kind of decoration is biodegradable. Unless clearly indicated, you can assume those things are synthetic (polyester, nylon, elastic, plastic) and can just be cut out with scissor.



7. Jams, jellies and canned fruit

8. Matches previously used

9. Leftover brine or canning liquid

10. Jell-O (gelatin)

11. Outdated yeast
You will not want to want to risk a bad batch of bread with an expired packet of yeast. But, according to composting experts, there may still be certain microorganisms that can help your compost.

12. Dried pet food

13. Wooden skewers

14. Wooden chopsticks

15. Wood ash

16. Tea bags

17. Candy

18. Hair

19. Feathers

20. Nail clippings
Yours or those of your pet as long as there is no varnish on it.

21. Cotton balls

22. Toothpicks

23. Natural wine corks

24. Sawdust

25. Eggshell


2 comments

  • UgoDutil

    Bonjour ! Le crayon de «plomb» est composé de bois et de graphite. Le bois peut aller au compost, je ne vois pas comment la graphie pourrait poser problème, mais je ne suis pas un expert 🙂

  • Creuset

    Bonjour,
    Pouvez-vous me dire si les taillures de crayon de couleurs peuvent être utilisés pour le composte?


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