Our fabrics:

 

 

Bamboo

Bamboo is the fastest growing plant in the world. Its cultivation requires no chemical fertilizers or pesticides. Its production uses four times less water than cotton and is totally biodegradable. Bamboo fiber is naturally anti-odor, antibacterial, hypoallergenic, anti UV and thermoregulatory. This fabric also has an absorbent capacity greater than the average.

Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus (Tencel® fiber) fabric absorbs moisture and prevents the formation of bacteria. It is extremely gentle and suitable for sensitive skin. This is a 100% natural fiber extracted from eucalyptus wood from certified environmentally sustainable plantations located in Europe. The fiber production process is environmentally friendly at all levels. The products used are recycled for its transformation up to 99.7%. More info…

Hemp

Hemp is much more resistant than cotton. It is hypoallergenic and non-irritating to the skin. In fact, hemp is one of the most environmentally friendly fabrics currently available. The plant is very naturally resistant to pests and growth requires little water. Hemp fabric has the distinction of “aging well”, in fact, the more you wear it, the softer it becomes.

Linen

Noble material, linen is an all natural fiber that requires no chemicals for growth or for his transformation. The fabric keeps us cool in summer and warm in the winter because it keeps the air in its fibers in fact a natural insulator. The linen cloth has a beneficial effect on sensitive skin. This is the most resistant fabric. It is not plush and not deformed. It softens with washing.

Respecterre is proudly MADE IN CANADA

Findhorn – ECOVILLAGE

Findhorn – ECOVILLAGE

It was a rainy day in the fall of 2014, but rays of sunshine slowly appeared on the horizon. With a somewhat distracted ear, I listened to the rattle of the train on the rails. I had been travelling for about twelve hours, and I was beginning the last part of my trip towards northeast Scotland. Verdant hills rolled along the horizon, where herds of sheep grazed, and trees and sharp cliffs stood tall. Upon my arrival in the town of Forest, I embarked on a bus to the small maritime village of Findhorn nested between bay and sea, right on the sandy hills.

Whole Village – ECOVILLAGE

Whole Village – ECOVILLAGE

In the summer of 2013, I discovered Whole Village thanks to a series of videos on YouTube. Later that year, some “La Cité Écologique” residents went to Ontario to visit this ecovillage located about an hour’s drive north of Toronto, as a meeting was held there for the Canadian ecovillage network. A few months later, at the beginning of 2014, a resident of Whole Village at the time, Peter, came to La Cité for a short internship. We shared a living space for a few weeks and, when he left, I told him I would one day visit him at Whole Village.

La Cité Écologique – ECOVILLAGE

La Cité Écologique – ECOVILLAGE

In my opinion, the biggest difference between our ecovillage and other similar places would be our financial independence. Although we are not self-sufficient in terms of food and do not live off the grid, those are goals we could meet in the long run. For now, all of us work for a company that belongs to La Cité Écologique’s residents. From the beginning, we have been working hard for companies that are now flourishing. This level of entrepreneurship is often less developed in ecovillages which focus solely on sustainable development. Yes, ecology is a priority, but we have found a balance between sustainable and economic development.